You and Your Perverted Self

“The true emotional meaning of the accident was all along hidden from the patient, so that in consciousness this emotion was never brought into play, the emotion never wore itself out, it was never used up.” – C.G. Jung, The Theory of Psychoanalysis

The urges that drive us, even now. We interpret and reinterpret them, make excuses for them, think we need them, go to great lengths (even commit crimes or risk our lives) to satisfy them. But do we doubt them, turn on them, question ourselves before we go too far? We know too many real-life cautionary tales, but they don’t satisfy our longing. We must do something to satiate our “need”.

The fact that many of these urges get channeled into sexuality is more a statement of the culture you’re brought up in than any kind of judgment of you. As long as sex and wish fulfillment are lumped together by you, that’s all you’ll feel comfortable with – someone whom you feel comfortable expressing those urges with. I come from a drama background, so I know there’s at least one other way. Who you are and what you want go hand in hand at any given moment in time, so why not express both publicly? That’s a pretty good recipe to get a number of people jailed, but it doesn’t have to be that way. If we fought against it, over time, things could improve. I know, that’s some pie-in-the-sky thinking, but shit, man, what better solution do you have?

Culturally, we’ve seen some pretty unexpected advances recently. Let’s not doubt that momentum, but keep it chugging on. Keep that ball rolling. It’s not like your perversion is going anywhere good. Just kidding!

I want to see more people expressing their deep inner urgings in public, as long as they are only hurting consenting adults.

I take that back – I don’t actually want to see it, that would give me nightmares. I just want someone to tell me it happened somewhere in public without making me watch the video to find out. Thank you very much for understanding.

Ye Olde Myers-Briggs

via MBTIonline.com | The Myers-Briggs Personality Test

Currently one of the most well-known personality tests is the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) assessment. I’m not trying to disparage it by saying that the last time I took this test I came out a four-way tie. That’s not really their fault, that’s the story of my life. Allow me this aside:

My astrology chart is fairly well-balanced around the wheel, which for me means that I’m pulled in different directions at once. I’m some of this, but also that, and I land in an in-between place that is neither here nor there. I’d make a horrible Nazi. That’s part of why I’m attracted to the subject of personality: I appreciate the peculiar and often humorous traits of others, but I also need to – you guessed it – get a grip on myself. But a couple jots better than Britney Spears does.

If you hear anyone talk of being a personality type and rattling off four letters that are unpronounceable together, that person may have taken the Myers-Briggs (or another test based on the same/similar concept, such as 16 Personalities. Both were launched from the work of Carl Jung, Swiss psychiatrist and psychoanalyst, who, in his 1921 book Psychological Types, laid the conceptual groundwork these tests stand upon).

16 Personalitites.com

I think of myself as an INTJ (Introverted iNtuitive Thinking Judging) type, or as 16 Personalities puts it, an “Architect”. Yet again, in their test, I came out nearly a 4-way tie (though technically a 2-way tie).

I think these tests are wonderful, and everyone should take them. Take all personality tests, for that matter. There is no real harm. But what does eat at me is that they are only asking me about me. My perception of myself, no matter how honest I think I’m being, is most likely skewed.

Were these tests handed to friends (let’s do it) and family (shudder), I expect the results would be different. I think me next post will be about the Johari window, and how best to clean it.